June 23

Written by Bill Grandi on June 23rd, 2020

Memory foam. Touted as the mattress material that “remembers” its shape. It always goes back to its original state. It bounces back.

The big C church has always been that way. Kick it; punch it; slap it; tackle it; it always come back. Not that if ever left. It has had to hunker down a time or two.  It has had to go underground for awhile. It has taken blows that looked like it was down for the count. It took on the look of the culture and about camouflaged itself out of sight, but it was always there. Like a phoenix it would rise out of the dust and ashes to become a champion.

How do I know that? Because Jesus said it would. He once said, “I will build my church and the gates of hell will not prevail against it.” I read the following quote that got me thinking:

Christianity has died many times and risen again; for it had a God who knew the way out of the grave. G.K.Chesterton

The big C church is under attack today. Speak out and we are accused of being homophobic, bigoted, opinionated, etc. Stay silent and we are accused of bigotry, prejudice, pride, and a lack of compassion. Many want to hide. But the church will never die. It may cloud over; it may become a funky gray color; it may appear misty; but it will stand. Why? Because we will remember Jesus’ word that the gates of hell will never prevail.  Never win. But the church will win. We have His Word on it.

“Father, thank you for the words of Jesus. No matter how bad things get; no matter how rough they get; no matter how disturbing and accusatory they become, the church will prevail.”

 

June 22

Written by Bill Grandi on June 22nd, 2020

Yesterday was Father’s Day. It turned out to be a right fine day. There was the worship that started it off right. It was good to see some more folks venture out. Each week a new group of people is venturing out.  I came home to a home-grilled meal of salmon, asparagus, baked potatoes, and corn-on-the-cob. Some friends stopped by with ice cream (I am their surrogate father/grandfather). I went to the Y then came home and read a novel the rest of the evening. A nice relaxing day. I am grateful.

Gratitude seems to be a dying art these days. We run around so much trying to meet our own agenda that to take the time to be thankful is lost on us. With inspiration from Chuck Swindoll, I’d like to take a few moments to consider how we often take things for granted.

  • There is a light over my head. Thanks Tom
  • There is electricity pulsing through my house. Thanks again Tom.
  • There is an instrument that allows me to talk to someone miles away. Thanks Alexander.
  • I will soon get in my truck to drive to work. Thanks Henry.
  • On my face are glasses which help me to read. Thanks Ben.
  • We will soon celebrate the 4th of July with a waving flag. Thanks Betsy.
  • My life is given over to Jesus. Thanks mom and grandad.
  • I come home each day to a place of warmth, welcome and love. Thanks Jo.
  • I am called father by two beautiful and special young ladies. Thanks Tami and Janna.
  • I am called “grandpa.” Thanks Braden.
  • I serve a group of people who love me, call me pastor and friend. Thanks OVCF.

I could go on but it would take pages and still not be exhausted. Instead of complaining, let’s be thankful.

“Father, thank you for so much, for so many gifts. I’m overwhelmed with gratitude to You for it all.”

 

June 19

Written by Bill Grandi on June 19th, 2020

The term pro-life has come to mean several things. Say, “I’m pro-life” and it will be (rightfully) assumed you are against abortion. It should mean so much more though. Sadly, it has come to be a point of contention. It should mean you are for life. From prebirth to death life is precious. We have a couple who knew before birth their son would be born with health-challenges, particularly the heart. But abortion never entered their minds, never even crossed them. A handicapped child deserves life. An older person who suffers from dementia, Parkinson’s, Alzheimers, or any other debilitating disease deserves life.

Yesterday I took part in a special dedication ceremony. A Safe Haven Baby Box (SHBB) was placed in Spencer. There are only 32 of the boxes in the country- Owen County is #32. The SHBB is for mom’s who have realized their end of taking care of their baby to be able to put their baby in the box. A door opens and inside is a baby incubator, where she can place her baby. The door locks, an alarm sounds both when the door is open and when a baby is placed in the box. It is both heated and air-conditioned. The alarm is sent to 911 where a dispatch is sent to retrieve the baby and put it in good hands. Every life matters and this gives an “unwanted” baby a chance at life. That is being proactive about pro-life! Two of our ladies-Shelby and Vicki-were a big part of making this a reality. I was honored to be asked to pray a blessing over this endeavor.

Every Christ-follower should be pro-life. That is not a political statement. It is a “life statement.”

“Father, Jesus came to give life and to give it abundantly. Help me to not only relish that life in and from Him, but to also show others life in Him.”

 

June 18

Written by Bill Grandi on June 18th, 2020

I’ve been out of touch for a couple of days as I visited my daughter and grandson in Ohio.  Except for his team losing (they didn’t do that bad with only two practices under their belt), we had a great time.  Here is my devotion for today:

Have you ever met a know-it-all? I’m sure you have. They have an answer to everything and for everything. Even if… they have no clue.

There is nothing wrong admitting you don’t have the answer to a question. I remember an old TV show-I think it was called Room 222-which had a Student Teacher (I think her real name was Karen Valentine) as one of the stars of the show. She was the student teacher and in one of the episodes I can remember her being asked a question and even though she did not know the answer, she faked one. Bad move. It came back to haunt her and her mentor was able to teach her a valuable lesson. I can’t remember the question or her “answer.” Or even the consequence. But I do remember the lesson she learned. There is nothing wrong with saying, “I don’t know.” It is better to say Idk than to make up an answer which proves to be untrue.

How many times have you or I been stumped by a question concerning God, Jesus, the Bible, something within the Bible, or some theological question and you tried to bluff your way through? The Trinity. God became flesh. The Sovereignty of God. Predestination/Election. The Second Coming. And so many more.

Seems it would be better to say, “I don’t know the answer to that” or “I’ll try to find the answer” than to try to bluff and be found out to be a Pharisee.

“Father, teach me humility and the willingness to admit I don’t know the answer to a tough question. I’m not expected to know it all anyway. Help me to keep seeking You and Your Word.”

 

June 16

Written by Bill Grandi on June 16th, 2020

Today is our 47th anniversary and we are soon to be heading to Ohio to watch Braden play his first baseball game of the year (thanks “rona” for messing things up). We found out last week, and since I was already taking the day off, I surprised Jo by suggesting we head to Ohio (4 hours); watch him play; stay the night; take him to IHOP; then head home. Wonder of all wonders she was agreeable! 🙂

Anyway, for the full story (and I mean much fuller) check out my other blog here.  I will not be posting tomorrow since we will be on the road early. Thanks for reading.  I’ll be back here on Thursday.

 

June 15

Written by Bill Grandi on June 15th, 2020

Goethe once said:

We must always change, renew, and rejuvenate ourselves; otherwise we harden.

He’s right when speaking of changing and moving with the tide, so to speak. But we must always remember there is one thing which never changes: TRUTH. Truth is not always popular, but it is always right.

We live in an age where truth is relative. We have no absolutes. That is post-modernism’s jig. It is seen in a recent documentary which played on ESPN on the life of disgraced cyclist-Lance Armstrong. At the very beginning the interviewer-who is also the shows writer/producer-asks Lance about the truth. He answers: “I will tell you the truth, my truth. (Emphasis mine).  Arrogance personified.  My truth as seen through my eyes. No moorings; no truth.

How typical of our day and age. Truth is what you or I make it to be.  Take the foundation away and all that is left is well…whatever I think is right. So right and wrong shift. It is “truth according to me.” Imagine if you would the writers of the Gospels, the life of Jesus. It would not be The Gospel of Matthew but the Gospel According to Matthew. Pick and choose what is true about Jesus. Can you see how the lack of truth is playing out in our world as well? Lie about the virus to fuel our agenda (political or financial or whatever else there is). Lie about events to cover the up the truth. When truth is compromised, chaos ensues. It happens in the church. Compromise the truth and the slope starts tilting even more. Compromise has an ugly end. No good comes out of it. I’m not talking about stubbornness/opinion in standing your ground. I’m talking about giving up truth. Opinions can be  compromised; truth cannot.

“Father, help me to fold fast to truth and never give in. Your truth never changes no matter what.”

 

June 12

Written by Bill Grandi on June 12th, 2020

One of the sayings which was used ad infinitum, ad nauseum during the COV”ID-19 crisis was “we are in this together.” While that is true to some extent (it is affecting all of our lives), it is also not true to some extent. It is hard to be in something together where the other person-or I myself- is belligerent and hard to get along with. I’ve seen it happen in sports, government, marriage, and yes, in churches.

When I pitched in Little League baseball, I once pitched a no-hitter. I would be foolish to think I did that all myself. I had 8 other players all pulling together to win 8-0. When I averaged 20 points/15 rebounds per game as a Junior in college, I’m a fool if I think for a moment it wasn’t a team game and I didn’t need the other four guys who were on the court the same time as me.

If you read Our Daily Bread today you will read the story of a pastor and a father (injured in a house fire) take turns running and carrying the father’s daughter to a hospital 6 miles away. When one tired of carrying her, the other took his turn. Together they made the journey together. Together they made sure the daughter and father were both treated.

Churches rely on people working together. When a leader or an individual or a pastor goes rogue, all kinds of trouble can break loose. Unless…it is checked by those who work together. One of the hallmarks of a church should be unity. Unity is not all thinking alike, but it is thinking with the common goal in mind. Jesus once said that all people would know we are His disciples if we love one another.

“Father, help me to be one who works together with others. Help me to be a catalyst for unity not division.”

 

June 11

Written by Bill Grandi on June 11th, 2020

I read two parables this morning-one easy to understand; one not so. Here they are:

Not so easy: It is found in Matthew 21 with related Scripture in Mark 11 and Luke 19.  It is the story of a father and two sons. He asks each of them to go into the vineyard to work. One says, “Not me” then goes. The other says, “I will go” but then doesn’t. So Jesus asks the religious leaders which one did the father’s will. They say the first- the one who said No, but then went. Given the other related Scripture, they actually condemned themselves. But what is the point of this confusing parable?  I think it is saying doing is more important than saying.  Mt. 7:21-27 shows that. But so does James 1:22- “But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves.” This point hardly needs talked or written about. Our life needs to back up our words.

The other, easy-to-understand parable is found in Matthew 21,  Mark 12, and Luke 20. It is the story of a landowner who had a vineyard.  He then decides to go away and leaves his winepress to be tended by servants. When it came time for vintage-time, he sent several servants who were either brutally mistreated or even killed. He finally sent his only son, whom they promptly killed.

  • Landowner- God
  • Caretakers- religious leaders
  • Servants treated poorly- prophets
  • Son- Jesus

His final point is the sharpest: “The stone which the builder rejected has become the chief cornerstone.”  (Mt.21:42). The meaning is clear-to them and to us. “They perceived that he was speaking about them.” (21:45)  You think? Oh, how perceptive! How’s that 2×4 feel?

Both parables apply to us as well. Will we do what we say? Will we accept or reject Jesus?

“Father, thank you for your teaching.  May I back up what I say with what I do and may I be one who accepts and obeys rather than reject and disobey.”

 

June 10

Written by Bill Grandi on June 10th, 2020

We talk a lot about lifting Jesus up. A song says, “We want to see Jesus lifted high/ A banner that flies across the sky.”  We might say or pray or sing for Jesus to be honored and glorified and lifted up, but do you know how hard that is? (‘Course you do). Have you given any thought to how hollow that sometimes sounds because of ineptness at doing that? Before I say why I think that is the case, let’s review.

In Number 21 the people became impatient with God. They were tired of and began to complain about the lack of water, food, and eating manna. So He sent fiery serpents among them that bit the people and many died as a result of it. They cried out about the sin so God had Moses fashion a serpent and put it on a pole and lift it up. All those who looked upon it would live. (21:4-9)

Fast forward a couple thousand years (give or take) to John 3:14 where Jesus said, “And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up.” Verse 15 tells why: “That whoever believes in Him may have eternal life.”

Later in John (chapter 12) Jesus is told some Greeks were seeking Him. In verse 32 He says, “And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people to myself.”

Three places where a distinct reference is made to Jesus being lifted up. The obvious understanding is that He will be lifted up on the cross.  In salvation, He is to be lifted up. In the daily expression of my faith, He is to be lifted up. Now to the original question; why is that so hard? The answer is easy really. I tend to be in this for myself way too much. To lift Jesus up means to point people to the cross and to lower myself in my eyes and in the eyes of others. No more “I’m in this for me.” No more “What can I get out of this?” I am to lift Jesus up because only by seeing Him will life and hope and salvation be found.

“Father, may I lay aside myself and lift Jesus up-in all things, at all times. As Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, may the cross of Christ be looked upon and give life.”

 

June 9

Written by Bill Grandi on June 9th, 2020

Have you ever noticed (I’m sure you have) how we spend a lot of time, effort, and money pursuing what doesn’t last?

  • That new car/truck. Gotta have it. Until it gets a scratch or a year or two old or shock-of-all-shocks we see a shinier, newer model.
  • That job promotion. Climbing the corporate ladder. It doesn’t matter who we step on. Sometimes it doesn’t even matter if we lose our family in the process. Then loneliness and dissatisfaction set in. Time for another rung.  Or go elsewhere.
  • MVP stats. 24/7 dedication. Gain the status of GOAT (Greatest Of All Time).
  • Tour de France winner. 7 times. Gotta get to the top. It doesn’t matter who we destroy along the way. Whose lives, careers, or livelihood we ruin. What compromises we make along the way morally, ethically, or athletically. It all comes crashing down.

Many spend their lives pursuing that which doesn’t last. Never has. Never will. I read an interesting quote which came from an unexpected source:

From the cradle to the grave man’s greatest objective is to obtain peace of mind and spiritual security. This is found only in Jesus Christ.

Who said it? An evangelist? A pastor? A theologian? A writer of religious books? A Bible translator? Nope. Wrong on all counts.  Are you ready for this?  Mark Twain. I don’t know when he said it; what prompted him to say it; or to whom he said it. But it most definitely is true. Search the world over. Pursue one adventure after another.  Investigate all philosophies. And the answer comes down to one: Jesus Christ. The one and only way to the Father, and the one and only way to complete satisfaction.

“Father, may I find my satisfaction in You. May the song be true: ‘Turn your eyes upon Jesus/ Look full in His wonderful face/And the things of earth will grow strangely dim/In the light of His glory and grace.’ ”