God’s Plan

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October 26

Monday, October 26th, 2020

When you think about prayer, there are a lot of crazy ideas going around.  ‘Course there are the lies and false ones (bordering on heresy) that you can tell God what you want and He will do it, especially if you name it and claim it in the name of Jesus.  There are those who say, “Why should I pray when God already knows?” That is a somewhat fair question. There is also one that I don’t hear much of in my circle but I know it is out there. Here is an example:

Praying to God and asking for a job or for Him to move in your life and provide some money (for example), but then just sitting in your chair-expecting the job or the money to fall into your lap. You and I might think that is absurd but then again you may not. It might be seen in another way. Say perhaps you ask God to provide for someone and you have the ability to do so but fail to help. That would be an example of James 2, of faith without works.

When we pray for something we should either be willing to get busy if its for ourselves or if we prayed on behalf of someone else. That’s like the two boys who were late for school. One said, “Let’s go!” The other said, “Let’s stop and pray we won’t be late.” The other said, “You can stop and pray but I prefer to pray while I run.” I think he got it right. 🙂

Run. Pray. Then keep running as if your life depended on it. Pray. Trust. Then do all you can in looking or searching.

“Father, I can pray in Your will and know you will answer. But sitting around and doing nothing is not what I believe you want. Trust and obey.”

October 22

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

There is no question our world is unsettled right now. As I write this in 2020, we have experienced a pandemic the likes of which my generation or after has never experienced before. We have watched cities be held hostage; cities burn and in some cases are still burning; corrupt politicians grease their own palms and flaunt their sinful agenda, thumb their nose at people all while doing their own things to further their agenda. We have seen lies and cover ups, the likes of which we have never seen before. We have seen sin flaunted in the open, almost daring us to say anything derogatory toward that sin. And we simply cannot forget the hatred and vitriol we have seen from and on social media.

Something is wrong. True. But we are also seeing a fulfillment of Romans 1: 18-32.  Put aside for a moment the obvious reference in that passage to homosexuality. See the blatant reference to mass chaos in our lives. How can we read this passage without seeing the result of disobedience to God’s law?

There is a story told -true or not is up for grabs-that a UK newspaper once asked its readers “what is wrong with the world?” It is told that G.K.Chesterton, a Catholic writer, poet and philosopher answered that question with a 4-word answer: “Dear Sirs. I am.” How’s that for brevity and truth? I am what wrong with the world. It’s called sin and I have the disease. We all do.

“Father, the only solution to the sin problem is You. Jesus died for my sin so I can know victory over death, hell and the grave. I don’t have to be intimidated by sin any more. Give me the strength to surrender my will to You. The reason: me; the solution: You.”

September 23

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2020

I have never met a person who said, “I love adversity.” In fact, the opposite is most often true: we try to avoid it like the plague. We read garbage like Your Best Life Now and think “I want my best life now. I want ease. I want comfort. I want prosperity.” We listen to trash that promises us health, wealth, prosperity, and comfort but leaves out the struggles, doubts, questions, adversity and unfulfilled dreams that are sure to come. If they do, we are told it is our lack of faith.

I read an interesting quote recently:

Adversity is sometimes hard upon a man; but for one man who can stand prosperity, there are a hundred that will stand adversity. Thomas Carlyle, Scottish philosopher

I’ve been listening to podcasts and reading lately about this whole idea of adversity and prosperity. It all relates to the pandemic we have been facing since March and its testing of our wills and outlook and patience. I know I’m sick and tired of masks, mandates and social distancing, etc that have come with it.  But, you know, we would not know how good things are, or could be, if not for when things get tough. Our Christian life is the same way. To live without adversity would never show us how good God is on a daily basis. I’m not asked to understand; I’m asked to trust. My vision may be cloudy now; it will become clear someday. While not desired, adversity is to be expected and even welcomed.

“Father, help me not to lament and complain about adversity.  Help me to see it as Your hand and move upon my life.”

August 20

Thursday, August 20th, 2020

Have you ever read or heard the story of someone and wondered “could I do that?”  For example, you read the story of someone wrongfully accused of a crime and spends years in prison, only many years later is found to be innocent. When that person is released he/she holds no grudge, no desire for vengeance, no animosity, and no anger. Then you read/hear that person has come to Christ while in prison and then you know the reason. But it doesn’t stop the “could I do that?” from going through your head.

Or how about this? You read the biography of someone who has an incredible life story. You are moved deeply by it and again wonder. For example, Joni, who has been a quad since a diving accident in her teens. It has now been over 50 years and along the way there has been two bouts with breast cancer as well. She holds no bitterness toward God.

Or how about George Mueller? He ran an orphanage for over 300 children. Often times his faith was tested. The story I read this morning was just such a story. He gathered his 300 children for breakfast…but there was no food for breakfast. So they prayed and thanked God for the food. What food? Oh, the bread a baker made when he could not sleep and delivered. And let’s not forget the milkman standing outside the door with milk from his broken down cart. He didn’t want it to spoil.

Talk about faith! Sometimes I’m just downright ashamed of my lack of it. Just the other night I laid awake a good part of the night wondering how I was going to pay for a dental procedure that is going to cost me close to $4k. Oh, me of little faith! I read the story of Mueller and I’m encouraged because His God is my God. The same one who owns the cattle on his hill owns them on mine. I still don’t know how that procedure will get paid for but it will. It’s not a want; its a need, a have-to. Maybe He’ll sell one of my cattle. 🙂

In I Cor. 10 (and I know I’m taking this out of context) it says, “Now these things happened to them as an example, but they were written down for our instruction, on whom the end of the ages has come.” Perhaps that story of George Mueller was written down and read by me this morning just for me. For this time.

“Father, no lesson is ever wasted. No challenge is ever lost. Help me not to lose sight of that truth. Help me to keep my eyes open to lessons from You.”

August 12

Wednesday, August 12th, 2020

Seems to me a lot of people either ask or silently wonder about the answer to this question: what am I here for? Many, many-maybe most-young people ask that question somewhere along the line.  It might be heard in other words like “What am I supposed to do with my life?” or “I’m not sure what I want to do for a living” or if that person is a follower of Christ: “What does God want me to do about my future?” What a person is doing when they ask that question or those questions is simply saying, “What is my calling?”

Calling. This came to mind this morning as I read the story in Acts 13 where God had the church leaders set aside Paul and Barnabas “for the work to which I have called them.” (13:2)  (emphasis mine). We talk a lot about “calling.” There are those who feel “called” to being a pastor. You might hear someone say, “I’ve been called to the mission field.” By the same token you might hear someone say, “I’ve been called to be a teacher…or a fireman…or an EMT…or a barista…or a (fill in the blank).”  Nowhere does it say a calling must be in full time church work. I have a blogging friend who feels called to be a loving wife, a Gammy, and a writer. I might also add “encourager.” She has certainly encouraged me. I have another reader who feels called to reach out with a food ministry, to deliver food to help those who can’t get it themselves. I feel called to be a pastor and that calling has sustained me for over 45+ years-through dark days and through light days; through full days and empty days; through highs and lows; through day of doubt and days of faith.

There is one interesting aspect of Acts 13 and Paul and Barnabas’ calling. Another name crops up: John, aka Mark. He must have thought he was called but later dumped them during that first mission trip (13:13). But if your calling is from God you can’t escape or forget it. Mark’s was. He came back, even though initially it caused a rift between Paul and Barnabas. Mark could not forget his calling. Neither can I. Neither can you.

“Father, each one of us has a unique calling from you. May I be faithful to that calling…no matter where it takes me.”

July 6

Monday, July 6th, 2020

My reading from John MacArthur’s book One Perfect Life covered Jesus’ time on the cross (6 hours). Several events stand out to be:

  • His first words were “Father, forgive them…” Not a complaint or a cry of agony or of unfairness. Words of forgiveness.
  • The soldiers unwittingly fulfilled prophecy by gambling for His robe. Check out Psalm 22:18.
  • The chief priests didn’t like what Pilate wrote on the inscription he put on the cross.  He wrote “This is”; they wanted “He said He was.”  Answer: “What I have written I have written.”  Pilate-1/ Priests-0
  • Two robbers were crucified with Jesus. I’ve always wondered about the one.  Did he originally join in the antagonism? Did he see and hear Jesus and come to his senses? Did Jesus talk to him as He hung there? (Remember John 21:25). Did he know at one time and return? Answers I will will never know until I see the thief or Jesus.
  • The utter agony of Jesus the last 3 hours on the cross seen in His words: Forsaken. Thirsty. Finished (task completed). Giving up (committal to His Father).

All for me. Undeserved.  Not asked for. Unmerited. All for me. And you. Sinners. To the core. Unlovely, yet loved.

“Father, how can I say thanks enough? How can I find the words? They fail me. Accept my heartfelt gratitude for your undeserved love and mercy and grace.”

June 23

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2020

Memory foam. Touted as the mattress material that “remembers” its shape. It always goes back to its original state. It bounces back.

The big C church has always been that way. Kick it; punch it; slap it; tackle it; it always come back. Not that if ever left. It has had to hunker down a time or two.  It has had to go underground for awhile. It has taken blows that looked like it was down for the count. It took on the look of the culture and about camouflaged itself out of sight, but it was always there. Like a phoenix it would rise out of the dust and ashes to become a champion.

How do I know that? Because Jesus said it would. He once said, “I will build my church and the gates of hell will not prevail against it.” I read the following quote that got me thinking:

Christianity has died many times and risen again; for it had a God who knew the way out of the grave. G.K.Chesterton

The big C church is under attack today. Speak out and we are accused of being homophobic, bigoted, opinionated, etc. Stay silent and we are accused of bigotry, prejudice, pride, and a lack of compassion. Many want to hide. But the church will never die. It may cloud over; it may become a funky gray color; it may appear misty; but it will stand. Why? Because we will remember Jesus’ word that the gates of hell will never prevail.  Never win. But the church will win. We have His Word on it.

“Father, thank you for the words of Jesus. No matter how bad things get; no matter how rough they get; no matter how disturbing and accusatory they become, the church will prevail.”

June 19

Friday, June 19th, 2020

The term pro-life has come to mean several things. Say, “I’m pro-life” and it will be (rightfully) assumed you are against abortion. It should mean so much more though. Sadly, it has come to be a point of contention. It should mean you are for life. From prebirth to death life is precious. We have a couple who knew before birth their son would be born with health-challenges, particularly the heart. But abortion never entered their minds, never even crossed them. A handicapped child deserves life. An older person who suffers from dementia, Parkinson’s, Alzheimers, or any other debilitating disease deserves life.

Yesterday I took part in a special dedication ceremony. A Safe Haven Baby Box (SHBB) was placed in Spencer. There are only 32 of the boxes in the country- Owen County is #32. The SHBB is for mom’s who have realized their end of taking care of their baby to be able to put their baby in the box. A door opens and inside is a baby incubator, where she can place her baby. The door locks, an alarm sounds both when the door is open and when a baby is placed in the box. It is both heated and air-conditioned. The alarm is sent to 911 where a dispatch is sent to retrieve the baby and put it in good hands. Every life matters and this gives an “unwanted” baby a chance at life. That is being proactive about pro-life! Two of our ladies-Shelby and Vicki-were a big part of making this a reality. I was honored to be asked to pray a blessing over this endeavor.

Every Christ-follower should be pro-life. That is not a political statement. It is a “life statement.”

“Father, Jesus came to give life and to give it abundantly. Help me to not only relish that life in and from Him, but to also show others life in Him.”

June 2

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2020

I’ve been doing a lot of listening to podcasts and reading blogs during this crisis. I’ve also been trying to enrich my life with reading books. One of my all-time favorite leadership books (Possible #1) has been Love Works by Joel Manby. I recently read the updated and revised version. Joel has some seriously good things to say. His philosophy of leading by love was easy at one place of business but extremely difficult at another. In an interview on a podcast Joel said a couple of gems:

You always learn more in a failure.

I take that to mean when things are going well and firing on all cylinders, it is easy to get lax. But crisis or failure stops on in his tracks and makes re-evaluation an essential.

He also said:

Sometimes in the very darkest moments, you don’t see a way out.  But you get through it. And then you realize that God was waiting to teach you something.

Been there; done that.

God speaks to us through His Word, but there are also times He uses events to teach us. Remember Elijah? It wasn’t in the whirlwind, or the earthquake, or the fire, but in the whisper that God spoke to him. (See I Kings 19:11-13)

Who knows how God will speak? But I do know we have to slow down enough to hear.

“Father, slow me down to hear Your whisper. Use this crisis to show me Your desire for me.”

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I’m in Ohio for a couple of days visiting Janna and Braden. Please comment and I will approve it in time.

May 25

Monday, May 25th, 2020

Today has been set aside as Memorial Day. It’s a day of remembrance for those who served in the military. In my 67 years, I have met many who have served. WWII. Korean. VietNam. Desert Storm. Gulf War. Afghanistan. Marines. Navy. Army. Air Force. Reserves. National Guard. Coast Guard. I know some who have come back wounded-physically, mentally, emotionally, socially. I know of spouses back home-families-who anxiously waited for their return.  I simply cannot fathom the agony of ones back home receiving word their loved one-husband, wife, son, daughter, etc.-are coming home, but in a casket. I shudder as I think of that even now.

But I am grateful for each and every one who served to keep something we value-freedom. I hate war. War is a necessary evil though. Sometimes we have to resort to that to preserve something so important. Freedom from the crown. Freedom from slavery. Freedom from oppression and evil. Freedom from terror and fear.

Each week we celebrate another kind of memorial-a memorial of a life given for others. We call it the Lord’s Supper. Someone went to battle for us. Only it wasn’t a battle with swords and guns; it was a battle against sin. Someone who didn’t deserve it went in our place. It was at the cross where the defining battle took place. Seeming defeat became the prelude to a death-defying victory.  This victory is far more important than any battle fought here on earth. This one had eternal implications.

“Thank you Father for the cross. Thank you for Jesus’ willingness to die in my place, to secure my freedom from death, hell, and the grave. I thank you also for each man and woman who served our country. May they know our gratitude today and always. And finally, and more importantly, I thank you for Jesus.”