June 27

Written by Bill Grandi on June 27th, 2024

All people matter to God, therefore they should matter to us.

Lately I’ve been reading a book on dementia entitled  Finding Grace in the Face of Dementia by John Dunlop, MD. Because it seems to be becoming a bigger issue these days, I thought I’d read up on it and learn more. It has been an eye-opening book (in a good way). Over and over Dr Dunlop has emphasized the importance of dignity for the dementia sufferer, as well as it’s kissing cousin, Alzheimer’s.

Dr. Dunlop is a committed Christ-follower so his perspective is different than many in the medical field. Instead of writing them off as a “nuisance” and a “bother” for others, especially their caregivers, he pushes the belief that showing them dignity is first and foremost. One very helpful section is found on pages 123-125 where he gives a number of practical way we can express dignity. He does it from the perspective of entering their “world.”

But this devotion is not a book review. While he has obviously focused his attention on the dementia patient, I couldn’t help but make the correlation to others in our sphere on influence. Each person we come in contact with should be deemed a person who matters. Whether it is the same sex, ethnicity, color, position in life, or social status, we need to, no, we must see them as people who hold special importance in God’s eye. As a Christ-follower that means they must hold importance in my eyes as well. We may not always agree, we may not always get along, we may butt heads from time to time, but that should not change how much each of us should matter.

In James 2 James warns the church about choosing sides and showing preference to one group over another. He says it is a shame and a black mark to do so (my loose translation). Jesus Himself told the parable of the Good Samaritan and showed how a man who was hated because of his ethnicity was actually more of a brother than the so-called “religious people.”

We have all seen people snubbed because of political affiliation. We have all seen people snubbed because of color. We have all seen people snubbed because of sexual orientation. We have all seen people snubbed because of status. We have all seen people snubbed because of a medical condition. It is ugly. Like I said, I may not agree with someone’s opinion or lifestyle, and can’t compromise the truth, but at the same time that gives me NO RIGHT to denigrate or write someone off as being persona non grata because we are different.

Dementia patients deserve loving treatment. We all do. Let’s begin to give dignity to others. Let’s begin to treat others as we would like to be treated. 

 

6 Comments so far ↓

  1. Amen! I wish every caregiver, whether by profession or relationship could grasp this. I have an aunt with Alzheimer’s who is on a nursing home. Some of her caregivers are wonderful, caring and respectful Others I wonder why they trained for this ultra-challenging, back-breaking job.

    • Bill Grandi says:

      it is good to see some taken care of and treated well. it is heart-breaking to see some abused and receiving a lack of care.

  2. I couldn’t agree more, Bill. May we respect the dignity of every human being as all are created in God’s image.
    Have a blessed weekend!

  3. gail says:

    Absolutely true Bill. God formed each and every one of us, God created each us in His own image. Jesus didn’t come to save the select few, Jesus came to save all. Reading your post made me think of the old song, they will know we are christians by our love, christians should be known by how they love every single person as God loved us.

    • Bill Grandi says:

      That song rings true Gail when you consider this topic. They MUST KNOW we love them because Jesus does!

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