July 16

Written by Bill Grandi on July 16th, 2021

If I were to pick one characteristic that was prevalent during COVID, or one that it highlighted, and one that still rears its ugly head, it is FEAR. Fear of infection. Fear of transmission. Fear of death. Fear of living life. Fear of (you fill in the blank).

This morning during my Encounter Time reading, it seems like God wanted to or had something to say about fear. First, read Psalm 118:6-9,14. “The Lord is for me, so I will have no fear. What can mere people do to me?” (v.6  NLT) I encourage you to read the other verses.

Second, Joshua 6: 1-7. It was totally illogical and frankly, military suicide, to do what God told the Israelites to do. In fact, it makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. The details are in the passage. Jericho was sealed up tighter than a drum and they (the Israelites) were told to march? Are you kidding me? What is the sense in that?

God was teaching them to stop seeing things from their perspective and their vantage point; He had a better idea. I’m reminded of Paul’s words in 2 Cor. 12:9- “My grace is all you need. My power words best in weakness.” (NLT)

When I can’t, God can.

When I’m unable, God is.

When I’m lost, God is my direction.

When I can’t see, God is my light.

It’s a promise. One I can count on and cling to. I am never alone. I am never wandering aimlessly in the desert. “It is better to take refuge in the Lord than to trust in people. It is better to take refuge in the Lord than to trust in princes.” (Ps.118: 8-9 NLT)

“Father, You are my refuge and my strength; my wisdom and life-giver. I have nothing to fear when I see things from Your perspective. Please help me to see things from Your point of view.”

 

July 15

Written by Bill Grandi on July 15th, 2021

I’m sure you have heard or maybe even had one of those love/hate things going on.

You love ice cream (guilty) but hate the calories (I don’t care).  🙂

You love pizza (guilty again) but hate the results (ditto).

You love feeling and looking good (guilty) but hate the exercise required (can’t say this).

Instead of the word “hate” use the words “don’t like it all that much.” 🙂

Seriously though, there are certain love/hate things that go on in my life. One occurred to me as I listened to a podcast Tuesday while driving…then I read something on Wednesday morning during my Encounter Time that cemented it. Please take a moment and read Hebrews 12:5-11. Again, I could link it here but I encourage you to get your Bible out and read it slowly.

Discipline. It took me a long time to separate discipline from punishment. Growing up I had someone who mistook punishment for discipline. As a father, I had to wrestle with my upbringing, to separate them and to realize that discipline was to teach. I didn’t always succeed (I’m ashamed to admit).

Even now I sometimes struggle with God and whether He is disciplining me or punishing me.

The truth is real though. I disciplined my girls because I love them. John Cooper (lead singer of Skillet) was a guest on the podcast (Alisa Childers) and he was telling how he disciplined his daughter and explained to her he did it because he loved her. A week or so later she came to him and said, “Daddy, that man hates his son.”

“Why would you say that?”

“Because he is pushing all the kids around and his dad won’t tell him to stop.”  🙂 🙂 

Needless to say she got John’s point.

And even though I am not fond of God’s discipline (sometimes it really hurts), I know He loves me.

“Father, thank you for Your discipline. It shows me You love me. Help me not to forget that truth when it hurts.”

 

July 14

Written by Bill Grandi on July 14th, 2021

In this day and age of “justice this” and “justice that;” of riots; revenge; senseless killing and getting even, we need to hear and use and practice another word:

MERCY

Jesus once said, “Blessed are the merciful, for they will receive mercy.” Please read it again. Is it saying the same to you as it is to me?

Those who show mercy will be shown mercy.

Mercy is a God-promise. Lamentation 3: 22-23 says, “The Lord’s acts of mercy indeed do not end, For His compassions do not fail. They are new every morning; Great is Your faithfulness.” What does the word they refer to? Acts of mercy. Everyday God’s mercies are new. Mercy is a God theme.

Imagine if we would practice mercy instead of justice. God’s mercy runs throughout Scripture. Would there even be an Israel, a Jewish nation, if God only exercised justice and no mercy?  How many times do the Israelites merit justice but instead receive mercy? On the cross Jesus didn’t say, “Zap ’em good Father.” No. Instead He said, “Father, forgive them.”

I’m in that same boat. For each sin. For each wayward look. For each idolatrous attitude. For each angry thought or word directed toward Him or someone else. Justice deserved; mercy given.

According to Lamentations 3 God’s mercy will never end. It will never cease and grace will never disappear. Each and every day I/you experience God’s mercy. EACH. AND. EVERY. DAY.

And get this! It is not warmed over, stale mercy. Every day it is new!! Can’t beat that!

“Father, each day Your mercies are new. Remind me over and over of that truth and then to absorb it. Help me to live in the light of that mercy…with you and with others.”

Two notes: First, don’t think for a minute that I don’t believe there is a place for justice. I do, but that is a topic for another day. Two, all Scripture is from the NASB 2020 translation.

 

July 13

Written by Bill Grandi on July 13th, 2021

Sometimes people say something or write something that rocks my world. Or at least stops me dead in my tracks.

Time for an honest confession: I put a lot into Sunday morning. Study. Research. Study. Reading. Prayer. Practice to an empty auditorium.  Study. Did I say study? 🙂 All for a short (but hopefully not too painful) 20-25 minute span of a Sunday morning. And I have to keep reminding myself that most, if not all, will not remember what I said.

That is why what Bob Goff wrote stopped me dead in my tracks:

Words will never move people the way love does. If our actions are motivated by love, we don’t have to worry about having big platforms or positions of power, because nothing holds a candle to love that has no agenda. (p.233)

Ouch!! I take his words seriously. All my yacking from the pulpit “ain’t worth spit” if I don’t love. Hmmm. Sounds a little like I Cor. 13:1 doesn’t it?

Recently I texted somebody and said, “It is one thing to say you love and another to live it. You live it.” I was dead serious.

I believe it is important to be ready for Sunday morning, don’t get me wrong. But I also think it is important to get to the point of hating the spotlight (it glows off my bald head anyway) and just be a light. To borrow a further thought from Bob: hate the spotlight and just be a light.

“Father, help me to love by living for you. That light will shine brighter than any effort I may make.”

 

July 12

Written by Bill Grandi on July 12th, 2021

Back in the ’80s I saw a movie that I haven’t been able to forget the main point.  It was about a young man who wanted to serve God but always saw himself doing it on a “big screen.” I don’t mean the “big screen” as in movies, but in doing big things. Like a big evangelist preaching to thousands (think Billy Graham big). The crux of the movie is that he realizes that to serve God and make an impact does not always mean b-i-g.

I’m not sure of the movie title (although I think I know it) so I’d rather not say it here. But I’ve never forgotten the premise of the movie.

A lot of Christ-followers think they have to do big things for God. They seem to always be scheming for their “next big venture.”

Two things seem to happen there. One, they keep striving for that big thing, and two, others feel inferior because what they do for Jesus seems so small. The Bible says we are all gifted differently. Some are gifted with those “up front” gifts, while others are gifted with more of a “behind the scenes” one. When it all shakes out, every gift is just as important. Go look at I Cor. 12 if you doubt that.

Long story short: we are all necessary. God’s kingdom and God’s work are not limited to the “biggies” and those up front. Where would the main actors be without the make-up artists, the stagehands, etc?  I have gone to several plays and shows where the props were moved by all those involved. Where would the pitcher who throws a no-hitter be without the other 8 players? That speaks volumes (or should) to the pastor, missionary, or Christ-follower who thinks its all about him.

“Father, help me to realize living for You and serving You is not a one-man team. It is a total effort of all involved.  Help me not to get too big for my britches.”

 

July 9

Written by Bill Grandi on July 9th, 2021

I apologize for the late entry and also the light entry. We left Ohio early so I could get back for an appointment. After the appointment I did some office work, we went to the Owen County Fair then came home and vegged. So I am sharing something short and late with you this morning. It is from Bob Goff’s book, Live in Grace-Walk in Love:

We don’t need to have all the information to start; we just need courage to take the first step. Don’t worry about next week’s potential problems. Give today everything you’ve got. Our stories are written as we live, so live fully. Our love is refined as we give it away genuinely, so love the people around you authentically. Let the story you’re writing be a page-turner.

Starting out on a task is hard, especially because we can’t see the end. We have no clue what the future holds (even with a DeLorean). 🙂 But we will never know the impact we may make or the influence we may have or the lives we may touch unless we get started.

“Father, help me to trust you in spite of the fact that I don’t know the end. But you do and that should be all I need to know.”

 

July 8

Written by Bill Grandi on July 8th, 2021

We will be returning from Ohio today.  Our grandson’s last baseball game for the summer was Tuesday. Janna’s friend’s last softball game was Wednesday and since we haven’t had a chance to see him play, we decided to combine two birds with one stone by making a quick trip. Your prayers for safety would be appreciated.

Tuesday morning in my reading through the NT, I read Hebrews 7. I must confess a “denseness” and sometimes a clueless factor when it comes to this chapter. I’m still somewhat unsure/confused about it. But here is my weak attempt to break it down.

It is the Scripture about Melchizedek and his relationship/comparison to Christ.

  • There is similarity. See verse 3. Mel is not Jesus but made like the Son of God.
  • Mel was greater than Abraham. Of course, we know Jesus was greater…than both
  • Mel came because with the Law an imperfect life was impossible. Jesus died for those under the Law because of this truth.
  • Jesus qualifies as a priest, not on the basis of a law, but according to the power of an indestructible life (v.16)
  • Jesus became the guarantee of a better covenant AND He holds His priesthood permanently. (v.22,24)
  • Jesus saves those who come to Him forever.
  • The Law was weak with weak mean; the word of the oath (promise) appointed Jesus who is forever; therefore, the promise is forever.

I don’t know. I’m still fuzzy and I sure hope I didn’t confuse you even more. I still have so much to learn. Maybe there are just some things we aren’t meant to understand????

“Father, continue to challenge me with Your Word. I don’t even want to say I have arrived or that I know it all.”

 

July 7

Written by Bill Grandi on July 7th, 2021

As my girls were growing up, I/we tried to be good parents. The nature of our personalities and the way we were raised made for an interesting mix. I tended to be more forceful; Jo more docile. I tended to be the one who used physical discipline (God gave a place on the human anatomy for that); Jo not so much. I tended to draw a line; Jo tended to fudge the line from time to time.  All in all though the girls knew we were on the same page as to why they were being disciplined.  There was no pitting us against each other.

We were (and still are) well-meaning parents. We are great grandparents since we can have all the fun and then turn him back over after we have spoiled him. 🙂  (Although living 4-5 hours away sort of short-circuited our opportunities to do that). Anyway, back to earth. Well-meaning parents,-no matter who you are-tend to think the way to mold a child, i.e. shape, control, and regulate behavior is to legislate. We do it by threats, manipulation, and even guilt.

But the truth is that no matter how often we use those different means, behavior cannot be legislated. No matter how much we say, “Don’t do this or that” sin enters the picture. Because we are sinners, sin is a matter of the heart.

Martin Luther King, Jr said that he “longs for the day when people will be judged not by the color of their skin, but the content and intent of the heart.” He was onto something. Not in the area of race (which he was referring to), but in the area of our behavior.

Until hearts are changed, lives won’t be changed.  Until my heart is changed, my life and behavior will not be changed.

I am grateful for God’s change in my life. I just want Him to keep transforming my heart day by day.

“Father, as Romans 12 says may I be ‘transformed by the renewing of my mind.’ May transformation be more than an outward show; may it be in inward heart change.”

 

July 6

Written by Bill Grandi on July 6th, 2021

Have you ever used or heard used the phrase: “He/she got a taste of their own medicine”? When that is used it’s not meant as a compliment. It is meant to be translated: “He/she got what they gave someone else.”

For example: judging. Often times we judge others with a much harsher eye than we do ourselves. But when we judge we need to be careful because very often it’ll come back on us. Like a monsoon or tidal wave. Matthew 7:1-5 is a perfect example of that.

But I want to look at it another way. Back on June 23rd I wrote a devotion about self-talk, i.e. what we say to ourselves about ourselves. I got a taste of my own medicine this past Saturday.

First, the backstory. Awhile back I wrote about taking my bike to the shop and getting the news that my frame was cracked. Not good. So since Trek is good for their word, I got a new frame free. Very good. The bike shop rebuilt my bike with some old and new components. One of them was a new cable. Over time a cable will stretch and needs adjusted. Usually around 100-200 miles. I’m past that and since I live over an hour away from the bike shop I thought I’d try to do it myself. My gears were slipping and making all kinds of chatter as well as shifting when they weren’t supposed to.

Two words describe my efforts: Epic. fail.

I watched a video. I had a voice call with the mechanic and I still couldn’t get it right. I was frustrated. Then the self-talk started. “Incompetent.” “Failure.” “Loser.” “Why can’t I use my hands like others?” I was able to get it somewhat right but not all the way. I will be taking it to a shop to get it right.

I defeated myself by putting myself down. Calling myself names.

Fortunately, that is not who I am in Christ. I am not incompetent; a failure; or a loser. Maybe I am unable to use my hands like others can, but in Christ I am His. And He has put His stamp of approval on me and given me something far greater than being able to repair a bike.  He calls me His.

“Father, thank you for the reassurance that Your thoughts about me are not dependent on what I can or cannot do.”

P.S. While I wasn’t able to get a complete adjustment, I found out I did okay on some of it. So I guess I wasn’t a total doofus. 🙂

 

July 5

Written by Bill Grandi on July 5th, 2021

HAPPY (DAY AFTER) INDEPENDENCE DAY 

If you have the day off today, enjoy it.  If you don’t still enjoy it. 🙂  Let’s start your day out right though with a devotion.

Time for a quick quiz:

Do you know what the letters ADHD stand for?

  • If you answered Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder you answered correctly.  Give yourself a pat on the back.

Do you know what the letters PTSD stand for?

  • If you answered Post Traumatic Stress Disorder you answered correctly. Give yourself a virtual high five.

Do you know what the letters RADD stand for?

  • If you answered “Cool” or “With It” give yourself a big raspberry. Or do you hear that sound from one of the game shows for a wrong answer? It means Redemptive Attention Deficit Disorder (courtesy of Paul David Tripp even though he did not put it into a highlighted 4-letter statement. That’d be me).

Explanation: We serve a dissatisfied Redeemer. He does not do His work poorly or incompletely. He doesn’t walk away from us while work is in progress.  I get that way sometimes when working a jigsaw puzzle.  I will sit and work for hours until my eyes are crossed, all pieces look the same, and my butt is tired from sitting too long. I wisely know it is time to walk away and shut off the light. I can come back later and work the puzzle.

God does not have RADD. He does not work on us for a short minute and then grow tired and walk away.  Good thing. I’m reminded of the verse which says, “He who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ.” (Phil.1:6)  That tells me that God stays with the project (me) until He is done.

When I’m done with a puzzle there is a sense of accomplishment, especially if it has been a difficult one. I have learned not to get discouraged by a lack of progress. Take one piece at a time. I sometimes wonder if God sighs at my lack of progress but then jumps up and down (figuratively not literally) when I stick with it and allow Him to do His work.

I’m so glad He is RADD, as in COOL. AWESOME. And I sure am glad He does not have ADHD.

“Father, do Your work and complete Your work in me. Keep me from being distracted and help me concentrate on being fully Yours.”